Subject: No sign of the Higgs boson
Date: Thu, 06 Dec 2001 16:18:14 +0100
From: "Dimiter G. Chakalov" <dchakalov@surfeu.at>
To: john.swain@cern.ch
CC: witten@theory.caltech.edu, wilczek@mit.edu, joelg@fnal.gov,
     incandel@fnal.gov, stuart@fnal.gov, holstein@physics.umass.edu,
     jackiw@lns.mit.edu, woit@math.columbia.edu, k.stelle@ic.ac.uk,
     science@hq.nato.int, stephen.reucroft@cern.ch

RE: No sign of the Higgs boson. New Scientist, 5 December 2001,
http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99991649

"Not everyone is too bothered, yet. Frank Wilczek, a particle physics theorist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, points out that you could take the LEP results as evidence that the Higgs must be sitting at an improbably high energy. He says he'll start to get uncomfortable if the Higgs doesn't show up by about 130 GeV. "Then I would have a good long think," he says.

"Swain says he'd bet large amounts of money that the Higgs doesn't exist."

 

Dear Dr. Swain,

I think your bet is safe. I also believe the time has come for 'a good long think' on what we need the most -- a theory of Lorentz invariant nonlocality.

First things first.

No need to spend billions of dollars, taxpayers' money, to chase a ghost. Please see my web site at the URL below. Questions and comments will be appreciated.

Regards,

Dimiter G. Chakalov
http://members.aon.at/chakalov
(last update 6 December 2001)